Hi, I'm Dara!

Welcome to Living My Someday! 

Here on LMS, I share my Whole30 tips, hiking and travel adventures with my family, motivation + life  lessons, and a few blogging biz tips.

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We're Not Ready for Healing.

Prompt:

As part of the healing process, please talk about how you processed the events of Ferguson.

Honestly, I did a lot of thinking on this issue one year ago, after the death of Trayvon Martin (and Jordan Davis, and Jonathan Ferrell, and Renisha McBride, and...), but I never dreamed we as a nation would be back here again. I've always been aware of my Blackness, but the full weight of being a person of color here in America came crashing down on me last summer. As I said in an earlier post, I have been a "respectable" member of society since birth, and in exchange, I expected to be rewarded with full recognition of my humanity. In actuality, however, my being a good person is meaningless to someone who finds my existence--or my children's existence--to be an affront. If all the racists simply separated themselves from the general population, the problem would be conveniently solved; unfortunately, many of them wear badges, openly carry guns, teach in schools, become doctors, and create public policies.

How does one find reason in this utterly unreasonable reality? Most days, I function quite well, focusing on the blessing of air in my lungs and eyes to see the tremendous beauty in my life. I do these things not for my country, but for myself and the precious few I hold dear. I choose joy because I refuse to drink the poison of bitterness. Sometimes, though, I am so disillusioned by the insidiousness of racism as well as the fierce resistance to identifying and eradicating it, that I literally shake with rage... 

We will never heal from the tragedy in Ferguson and the shameful actions that followed because they are symptoms of the root problem America continues to deny: its inherent pathology of racial inequality. Until we confront history, we are doomed to repeat it.  

Law and order exist for the purpose of establishing justice and when they fail in this purpose they become the dangerously structured dams that block the flow of social progress.
Martin Luther King, Jr.

 Please stop talking about healing. We're not there yet.

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